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From:  Valerie Sutton
Date:  Wed Mar 1, 2000  8:15 pm
Subject:  Re: double headed arrows


Referring to:
Question 0043: Shaking & Rotation Symbols
http://www.SignWriting.org/lessons/less018.html

On 3/1/00, Steve/Dianne Parkhurst wrote:
>Anyway, as I said, we tried this out with our students. We wrote the sign
>for BIRD (wings flap) with double-headed arrows and a tie, and they
>mis-read it every time, flapping one "wing" down when the other went up.
>And these were the same students that said they WANTED double-headed
>arrows. Since we found that they made more mistakes when they had to look
>for the single or double tie marks than when they had to look at the
>multiple arrows, we discourage them from using them. So what we teach is
>that, yes, you can use double-headed arrows when you write by hand and want
>to write fast, but it's better not to use them in final drafts of writing
>projects.
>
>That is just my opinion. By the way, I do like the double-headed arrows on
>the head movements and things like that where there is no confusion.

>Steve :-)

---------------------------------

Hi Steve!

This is GREAT feedback and it makes me feel better, because I have
never once published a document with the double-headed arrows myself.
And at present, the double-headed arrows are not mentioned in the
Lessons in SignWriting Textbook, although we always used them in
Shorthand...which you mention above.

And students have asked me why I didn't use them in the past, and I
told them that it was my instinct that they could be mis-read....but
I never had any verified feedback on that....so you have supplied
this - thank you!

Meanwhile, I know that in Nicaragua, and in Denmark, the
double-headed arrows are being used....so I guess it depends on how
much detail is required...

Denmark also made other changes...one of them may be of interest to
you...they threw out the dark arrowhead for the right arrow, and the
light arrowhead for the left arrow and only used the general
arrowhead for all movement...I tried that when transcribing a story
signed in ASL, and I had no choice but to go back to using the right
and left arrows, because sometimes the left hand would be over on the
right side of the body in almost "mime-like sequences", and I needed
the detail for the reader.

So there are several places in the system where simplification has
been tried, and then has met mixed-success...so that is why I am
trying to document all this, so we have a pool of information to draw
from in the future.

Thanks for your feedback, and thanks for your excellent
illustrations, Steve! As you know, they are a hit!


Val ;-)

------------------------------------

Valerie Sutton


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